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At CFPB, bitter feelings about final Cordray maneuver

Employees at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau are privately questioning why outgoing director Richard Cordray abruptly tapped a 34-year-old chief of staff with no enforcement, supervisory or legal experience to head the embattled agency after he resigned.

Leadership clash at CFPB continues as two claim mantle

WASHINGTON — Two people are now claiming to be the rightful leader of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

CFPB Director Richard Cordray's final act to appoint his own interim successor before stepping down — Leandra English, the agency's chief of staff — came hours before the Trump administration named Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney as the temporary director.

It is now unclear who is legally entitled to the job, and both appear likely to show up Monday to claim the mantle.

Monday at CFPB: Doughnuts and Two Bureaucrats Claiming They’re in Charge

If there’s a question mark over who’s in charge of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Mick Mulvaney is having none of it.

 

The White House budget director, who has called the financial watchdog the “worst kind” of government entity, showed up bright and early Monday with an olive branch for the CFPB’s bewildered staff: doughnuts. He then started pouring through briefing books and sent a memo to workers advising them to disregard any orders from the agency bureaucrat who’s separately asserted that she’s the boss.

Why Democrats are to blame for consumer agency debacle

President Donald Trump is likely to control the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for years to come. And Democrats have only themselves to blame.

Trump budget director Mick Mulvaney and Leandra English, a legacy employee of the Obama presidency, faced off on Monday over which of them has the authority to lead the bureau amid dueling statutes after CFPB Director Richard Cordray abruptly stepped down on Friday.

White House Criticizes CFPB for Naming Own Temporary Chief

WASHINGTON—A standoff between the Trump administration and Obama-era officials over who gets to temporarily run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau intensified Saturday, with President Donald Trump saying on Twitter that the agency was “a total disaster as run by the previous Administrations pick.”

White House Holds Its Ground on Sending Mick Mulvaney to CFPB

A high-stakes legal clash is unfolding over President Donald Trump’s temporary pick to run Elizabeth Warren’s favorite bank regulator, and the White House is holding its ground.

Trump on Friday said he’s naming White House budget director Mick Mulvaney to be the temporary head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The announcement came hours after outgoing CFPB Director Richard Cordray said he was tapping a deputy to run the agency on an acting basis, a move widely seen as an attempt to prevent the White House from naming a successor.

Trump asserts legal power in fight over consumer bureau

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WEST PALM BEACH, Fla./WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump has the power he needs to put his top budget aide in charge of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), federal officials said on Saturday, weighing in on a battle for control over the powerful agency. 

 

White House says Trump has right to name CFPB head, setting up clash

The White House said President Donald Trump has the authority to put budget director Mick Mulvaney at the helm of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, setting the stage for what could be a protracted legal battle.

A senior administration official said the decision to appoint Mulvaney was informed by communication with the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, which will issue a formal opinion soon. Mulvaney, director of the Office of Management and Budget, will start his second job at the CFPB Monday morning, replacing Richard Cordray, who resigned Friday.

Leadership clash at CFPB continues as two claim mantle

WASHINGTON - Two people are now claiming to be the rightful leader of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

CFPB Director Richard Cordray's final act to appoint his own interim successor before stepping down - Leandra English, the agency's chief of staff - came hours before the Trump administration named Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney as the temporary director. 

It is now unclear who is legally entitled to the job, and both appear likely to show up Monday to claim the mantle.

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